Blog Comments

  1. grynge's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Chabrenas
    Jeez!! Where did he find a travel agent that handled the hotel? On a South African website? And did he drive a hire car in from Hermanus to the games he watched? Depends what part of Oz he lives in, but it's rather a scenic (read 'hairy') drive for many people.
    The hotel was booked here in Australia using an Australian travel agent. He didn't drive whilst over there he just used cabs to get around.
  2. Chabrenas's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by grynge
    He came back from the world cup yelling about his hotel (which he had booked through a travel agent and not taken my suggestions from my friends who live in hermanus) the hotel was basically in an all black neighbourhood and when they got there even the manager suggested that they quickly leave and go to their sister hotel in a safer area.
    Jeez!! Where did he find a travel agent that handled the hotel? On a South African website? And did he drive a hire car in from Hermanus to the games he watched? Depends what part of Oz he lives in, but it's rather a scenic (read 'hairy') drive for many people.
  3. Kay's Avatar
    Thanks, grynge. I find that comments are very helpful for giving me ideas of what to write about next. I do have quite a bit of experience of Thailand, although I don't live there these days. It's a very popular destination for many good reasons. The worst thing about it is the red tape, which in recent years has sent many expats away to look for alternatives.

    A year (or more) in Thailand is very doable, as long as you know and obey the rules, especially those about visas and work permits. But don't swot up on them too far in advance before you leave because they change quite frequently.
  4. grynge's Avatar
    A great read Kay and seeing I am thinking about taking a year long holiday in Thailand I look forward to the next installment. A friend of mine is one of those guys that thinks because he has money the rest of the world should fall at his feet (which is why I never go on holiday with him anymore) He came back from the world cup yelling about his hotel (which he had booked through a travel agent and not taken my suggestions from my friends who live in hermanus) the hotel was basically in an all black neighbourhood and when they got there even the manager suggested that they quickly leave and go to their sister hotel in a safer area.
  5. Kay's Avatar
    I didn't make myself very clear yesterday. (Too much Tiger in my tank.)

    I don't know what schools teach these days. As a parent I'm sure you have much more information about that. In my day, we were taught history and geography from the point of view that the whole universe revolved around Britain and the British. We were taught to feel superior to other nationalities. I guess that was a hangover from the days of the Empire. Heck, even the USA is an ex-colony, as is Australia.

    It's one thing to be patriotic and feel proud of your country's achievements but it's terribly old-fashioned and ill-informed to maintain this feeling of superiority. However, that's pretty much what they taught at my school. If they still teach from that view-point (and perhaps they still do - judging by those English people's behaviour at the airport) then the Brits will be in for a shock if/when they go out into the world. The world is not there waiting to welcome you with open arms just because you're British.
  6. Clinton's Avatar
    I don't know about the education being responsible. I'd say it was the lack of education (or maybe that's what you meant). Kids are so not taught the right things in schools. But that's another topic altogether!
  7. Kay's Avatar
    I agree with you, Clinton. And would add that it's the country's education system that's responsible for much of the misconceptions. Heck, I thought that Marco Polo (funny name) and Christopher Columbus were British until I went out into the world and discovered that the whole world ain't about Brits.

    Our status often gave us the opportunity to meet the rich and famous. That was nice, but rubbing shoulders with these people was not something we would have had the opportunity to do back "home". I liked meeting the boss of the Indian Air Force, the Finance Minister, and all these kind of guys. The point is that you don't get that just because you're English. (I'm not English anyway - in case anyone thought I might be. Bleugh to the English.)
  8. Clinton's Avatar
    "But we're English! You must fast-track us!" Buffoons!
    To be fair, that's how it was in their dad and mum's day. Being British opened doors and got you preferential treatment. Big time. I recall stories from my parents' generation in India who grew up under colonial rule.

    Now it's the attributes of money, fame and power that get you fast track treatment
  9. Kay's Avatar
    We lived in India for a few years (diplomatic visas) and it was incredible how many people back in the UK saw the opportunities in India and thought that they could easily take a piece of the action. No! It looks attractive because the cost of living can be less, but so many people don't seem to realise that these foreign countries won't welcome them with open arms.

    I saw a shameful sight at an airport in Thailand. If you had paid for a business class ticket you could fast-track through the immigration and security process. There was a couple there, presumably with economy class tickets, and they were protesting, "But we're English! You must fast-track us!" Buffoons! They seemed to think that the world would fall at their feet because they were English. Uh-oh - it doesn't work like that. (Only the English like English people. No one else does. Oh poo, I forgot, I married one but that doesn't count because he's adopted my nationality and wears a kilt on appropriate occasions.)

    You're probably right, Clinton. Maybe it's easier for an Indian to go to the UK than it is for a Brit to go to India.

    The days of the Empire are long gone so if you think you can pack your bags and make your fortune in any country of your choice then you are mistaken. I would have been a great Memsahib - the kind of girl who would rip up her petticoats to bandage people caught in the flak. But that's not how it is these days. These countries are very modern and they have their own way of doing things.

    Your choice as a Plan B person is to take it or leave it. Abide by their rules or forget it. Being British (or American, Canadian, or Australian) gives you no advantage. It just means that as a farang (foreigner) you have to try that bit harder to make things work for you.
  10. Clinton's Avatar
    Good points, Kay. I can vouch from experience that, contrary to popular belief, it's easier for someone to migrate from India to the UK and get permanent stay here than it is for someone from the UK to move to India and do the same.

    People often think that because they live in a developed country it's an advantage when it comes to moving to another developed country. That ain't so. Whether it's Australia, the US or the UK, they don't care where you've come from, what your accent is like or how pretty you are. They are only concerned about whether you meet the legal requirements for work/stay/marriage whatever.

    I watch a programme about immigration at Heathrow. It's funny how often someone arrives and says they've got a partner in the UK they hope to marry. They believe it helps their case and is more likely to get them in .... when the exact opposite is true! They get refused entry into the UK because they may marry a UK citizen and get permanent stay!
  11. Kay's Avatar
    Hi MrP

    No, I've not even heard of it. I looked it up on Wiki and discovered that it's a popular gift for graduating students in the US and Canada. I'll keep my eyes peeled for it. Thanks for the heads up.
  12. MrP's Avatar
    [QUOTE]I said, "There has to be a Plan B". And so there was. There was an uncertain path leading away from the main road. It was unsignposted, unmapped, dark, with many twists and turns. Perhaps only a crazy person would choose to go down that route. But that's what I wanted to do. I managed to persuade Dave to come down this path with me, and here we are seven years later. Much richer in some ways and poorer in others. It's not always been an easy journey, but I don't regret for a moment turning off the main road.

    [/QUOTE]

    Kay - Have you been reading 'Oh the places you'll go' ?
  13. Clinton's Avatar
    I'm looking forward to this, Kay