Blog Comments

  1. Clinton's Avatar
    Good point. It makes sense for these sellers to buy some cheap links to their domains and I can see that really working for them when they send these emails out!
  2. crabfoot's Avatar
    You were late, I'm distinctly tardy.
    As part of my routine, I always google the draft title I have to see what competition I'm up against. That often suggests a tweak of the title that will just rank ahead of even authoritative sites like wikipedia.
    That's a GREAT tip.
  3. crabfoot's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Chabrenas
    What rights did you buy for that price? Your personal copy, or rights to redistribute? Will you just use it as a schema for producing a new, proper product, or will there be a connection of some sort with the original?
    I got full resale rights to a load of old out of date info eBooks that I would feel guilty selling to anyone, and an old tool that doesn't work because the file is corrupted. I will, as you suggest, use some of the twaddle as schema to produce something worthwhile that may be used as "giveaway" ebooks, or site material.

    I had some idea what I was walking into, so I used a liquidID to sign up and avoid the rest of the rubbish the guy is trying to upsell. Buying things like this is like a poker playing situation - sometimes you pay $10 to take a look at a hand that you are 95% certain has you beat.

    I don't know why Josephine Public has to suffer this way - maybe she doesn't play poker.
  4. Chabrenas's Avatar
    What rights did you buy for that price? Your personal copy, or rights to redistribute? Will you just use it as a schema for producing a new, proper product, or will there be a connection of some sort with the original?
  5. crabfoot's Avatar
    Worra loda rubbish. Could've told y that for nowt ...
  6. crabfoot's Avatar
    Update - the panda has dumped most Storeburst sites into the sandbox - don't go there!

    There's a program for existing Storebust customers that lets them set up stores with WordPress, but that's another "beta", and I don't know of anyone using it.
  7. bwelford's Avatar
    Sorry to be late to the discussion, but I did want to say how much I appreciated your post, crabfoot. In this long tail targeting, I find the title of the post (assuming we're talking blogs) critical in getting search engine visibility. As part of my routine, I always google the draft title I have to see what competition I'm up against. That often suggests a tweak of the title that will just rank ahead of even authoritative sites like wikipedia.
  8. Clinton's Avatar
    Excellent points, crabfoot.

    I know some people who used to be very good at this arbitrage - buying general "hifi" traffic from Google and elsewhere and convincing those visitors to buy a specific product.

    Find people who need a solution but are still confused. They may not be at the stage where they've got the credit card out but convince them that your solution is the best one for them and they'll click your affiliate link and make a purchase.
  9. crabfoot's Avatar
    Your advice refers to affiliate sites
    Er - no, I'm trying to re-start domains that have been used for aff sites. While having keywords that pay is very important for aff site pages, the point I'm making is that "paying keywords" are a very relevant factor for any type of site. Yes, it is harder to see how to use them with Adsense, but the "targeting tags" can be used to (eventually) improve the ad focus.

    I've got some sites where I've tweaked the Adsense using the targeting tags to give much better results than letting the Adsense work from the text. The most important thing to take from this is the way that makes the tags work to show the ads you want.

    Now, let's say you have a page showing data for old radio valves, or vacuum tubes in Yankspeak. Left to its own devices, Adsense shows ads for all sorts of unrelated doodah.

    You set tags to make Adsense ignore the page text and use the targeting tags on a sentence somewhere on the page that reads "mysite.com, bringing you info about radio valves and vacuum tubes".

    After Adsense has thought about it for a week, your site is filled with adverts for radios, plumbing fixtures, vacuum cleaners and cardboard tubes.

    Change the sentence to read "mysite.com, bringing you info about radiovalves and vacuumtubes" and it looks stupid - but the ads show the products your audience want.
    Updated 6 February 2012 at 1:29 pm by crabfoot
  10. Kay's Avatar
    I enjoyed reading your article. Thanks. Your advice refers to affiliate sites and you're emphasising the concept of pre-sales and how choosing keywords targeted towards a pre-sold audience will work better than others. I completely agree.

    However, I don't agree with your point that it's so often overlooked or not mentioned. In my experience it's frequently been one of the most basic concepts underlying any recipe for success in affiliate marketing. It's a point that's hammered home time and time again.

    Finding keywords that pay is, of course, a different matter if it's an AdSense site rather than an affiliate one, but that's another story.
  11. KenW3's Avatar
    Excellent article! All traffic is not created equal. People searching for exact product names and numbers know what they want. I would sooner have visitors that typed "buy widget" than rank for "widget review", as closing a sale from the latter is much more difficult.
  12. Makeit's Avatar
    Great post and lots of practical info. Yes agree Traffic is King.

    Thanks
  13. Kay's Avatar
    Great post, Crabfoot.

    There's a good list of ways to drive traffic here:
    http://experienced-people.net/forums...etting-traffic
  14. TheGreenMan's Avatar
    Very informative, thanks crabfoot! Definetly a more clear vision of where to start. Kudos mate, and once again, great job, this kind of help is what noobies like myself are lookin for!

    -tgm
  15. crabfoot's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by benitez17
    I don't see how oversight by any group would avoid the scenario you describe. Most, if not all, of the problems you describe seem to be caused by poorly defined relationships and selfishness. I think the best way to solve those issues is well defined contracts, not additional self imposed regulation.
    I'm describing what happens in real life. Someone has an original idea, and needs cash and help to make it a profitable reality. After the origination of the business and its progress into profit, the originator's skills are superfluous to the continuation of the business. Often unaware that a "power coup" has been arranged, he turns up to work one day to find that other people have declared him redundant.

    If it is your idea, it can be difficult to retain control of the resulting company, and those "business angels" do this sort of thing to innovators all the time. I'm just saying that, if you are the "ideas person", you need extra protection from somewhere ...
  16. benitez17's Avatar
    [QUOTE=crabfoot;bt235]Not government - that is for public protection - external, yes.

    Because so many people value their own perspiration above someone else's inspiration, it is natural for them to attack someone who does not appear to contribute to their wealth, while taking a salary.

    When they do this, they often get rid of the person - but they also get rid of insight which is beyond their capacity, so they are more prone to fall into "bear traps" which could otherwise have been avoided.
    To put this in other words -
    The tendency is for joint ventures to build into a viable entity, then collapse or fall into a period of low growth, because some members in positions of power do not acknowledge the seminal contribution provided by other members. These people will work to "edge out" the person or persons who had the good idea that provides their bread and butter, using methods (verbal / influencing techniques) that outskill the other man/ people. The company trundles on without the visionary. When they are faced with a failure situation, they might realise that they sacked the wrong man ...

    Frankly, I can only think of one example of a man who had a good idea, sold it to a major corporation, and managed to draw a decent return from his ideas until he died. He was Captain Stanley R Mullard, who sold his valve manufacturing company to Philips in the 1920s but was still on the board until his dotage. I wish I'd met him.[/QUOTE]

    I don't see how oversight by any group would avoid the scenario you describe. Most, if not all, of the problems you describe seem to be caused by poorly defined relationships and selfishness. I think the best way to solve those issues is well defined contracts, not additional self imposed regulation.
    Updated 14 January 2011 at 11:22 pm by benitez17
  17. crabfoot's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Clinton
    Nice post, crabfoot
    Why do you feel a web based business needs more monitoring from an external/govt body?
    Not government - that is for public protection - external, yes.

    Because so many people value their own perspiration above someone else's inspiration, it is natural for them to attack someone who does not appear to contribute to their wealth, while taking a salary.

    When they do this, they often get rid of the person - but they also get rid of insight which is beyond their capacity, so they are more prone to fall into "bear traps" which could otherwise have been avoided.
    To put this in other words -
    The tendency is for joint ventures to build into a viable entity, then collapse or fall into a period of low growth, because some members in positions of power do not acknowledge the seminal contribution provided by other members. These people will work to "edge out" the person or persons who had the good idea that provides their bread and butter, using methods (verbal / influencing techniques) that outskill the other man/ people. The company trundles on without the visionary. When they are faced with a failure situation, they might realise that they sacked the wrong man ...

    Frankly, I can only think of one example of a man who had a good idea, sold it to a major corporation, and managed to draw a decent return from his ideas until he died. He was Captain Stanley R Mullard, who sold his valve manufacturing company to Philips in the 1920s but was still on the board until his dotage. I wish I'd met him.
  18. crabfoot's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by benitez17
    Nice post. I'd say that the oversight required in your example should come from an unaffiliated auditor or accountant, not the government. There are already plenty of regulations regarding partnerships and corporations in place.
    Not the government - they represent the PUBLIC - but there has to be some body equinaminously overseeing the interests of all involved, and it should be a "body" (harder to persuade than an individual). That is my point.

    I've given a lot of ideas away in my time, and rarely seen a "Brownie Point". One idea I had, I gave to The Laboratory Of The Government Chemist in a fit of pique when my boss said we couldn't use it in the company. They have over 20 patents on it, and all I have is the memory of discarding their Letter of Thanks with the words "Fat lot of good that's done me" in my mind ...
  19. benitez17's Avatar
    Nice post. I'd say that the oversight required in your example should come from an unaffiliated auditor or accountant, not the government. There are already plenty of regulations regarding partnerships and corporations in place.
  20. Clinton's Avatar
    Nice post, crabfoot

    This follows from a discussion we've been having in the VIP Lounge: thread (access limited to active members who meet a minimum post count).

    I agree with the carefully thought out bit, but not the monitoring. A collaboration of webmasters who get together to invest money jointly in a business is just like any other group of people starting a LTD company. There is already regulation to cover that. Why do you feel a web based business needs more monitoring from an external/govt body?