+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Is the internet for small businesses obsolete?

  1. #11
    Dormant Account
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Currently based in Namibia
    Posts
    493
    Thanks
    199
    Thanked 727 Times in 290 Posts
    Rep Power
    30
    The reality is that the bubble burst, shards of that bubble are still poking holes in every other bubble out there. These bubbles are the concept of easy money on the internet.
    90% of business models on the internet.

    I am going to sell great information: An excellent idea, information is valuable but if your information was that valuable surely it should be making you a lot of money so you do not really need to sell it?
    I am going to sell some products, specifically some one else's products: Well again its a proven model but as the internet is one long high street you have been beaten to the punch and you cannot just move down a few roads, not any more.
    Well I could really cut costs by selling some one else's product out of their garage, uh hm basically I will sell slips of paper and the person can go and fetch it from the garage. What a great business model this is going to cost me all of $5 to setup and I can steal a premium template some place. (we all know the type).

    Then we have a people who have just let the curve pass them so far by, they are not even in the same time zone. I am going to build a directory for local business, thats a great idea right.
    How are you going to leverage social media? Well I thought I would just like post it up to facebook once a day or so, it will work out fine.
    Have you thought about creating an application for your product?
    Uh, no those things are like expensive and way complicated and it will just be fine without one.

    I could rant for hours and pages about things like the above. The reality is the internet is full of opportunities, business and money. The reality is though it has become real business and if your not on the top of your game someone is going to beat you to it. The prerequisite skill level to enter has gone up dramatically, new technology is making it more complicated every day.

    The only places I still make any real money on the internet is through unique item sales and selling skills. Its far from the utopian internet where Adsense magically pays my car off and clickbank takes care of my mortgage while I walk the dogs.
    However if you have something truly unique to sell, say or do there is still money out there. The sad reality for most newcomers to this game is they have come looking to the internet as a source of income as they lack the above mentioned.
    It's always interesting to watch forums and see who is asking about traffic generation verse the person asking about the best place to lease a server. Then look at the difference in the sites and whats on offer.

    So enough carping on from me, how do we even begin to prosper on the web today.
    1. Throw away any make money you have bought, you cannot teach some one to make money on the internet I am now convinced by this. You can only help to impart skills, knowledge and advice that allows them to increase their money making potential.

    2. innovate and partner, swim with the winners and look for opportunities. A while ago I had a small turn key website business on the bubble, all in all a pretty good offering to clients and profit margins and slightly unique in what offered. If I had time or luck I should have found some one who could expose the offering to a wider audience and initiated some kind of profit share. The reality is there is opportunity for synergy every where.
    (That boat has sailed no need to pm anyone).

    3. Make a check list of every avenue you could be using and do a realistic audit of how you are performing. Retailers make a mint from pinterest, if your not? Well it could be your product is boring and old hat, you could be sharing in the wrong circles, perhaps your doing pinterest correctly but lack the understanding of how to leverage other social platforms to work with it?
    Are you not getting subscriptions to your mailing list? Better work out why as trust me they work for a lot of people, really they do.

    4.Think local to go global, if I had a product on sale at this time that was relevant to this community, I would give it away to everyone of you. We are a small group in comparison to the world and some of you may even talk about it to other people. This same principle can be applied to anything, find the right people to use your "thing" and get them doing so.

    5. Try new things, Ebay sucks, etsy has a dedicated community though, you can have a facebook shop up and running in minutes. As I often say to people if its a really good product at all important levels, some one someplace wants to buy it. The sweet spot exists and you just need to find it.

    6. Ensure you have a budget and make sure it covers your needs, a lot of people think an idea makes them an internet entrepreneur. Sadly you need skills or capital, it is unfortunate you lost your job and its a pity you do not have a degree or $5. The reality is though you need a job not a dream, empires are not built on good will and hope. Be realistic about this I often encounter clients who have spent $30k + on equipment, premises, what have you and then cannot see their way to spending money on a online marketing campaign.

    7.Keep up with the trends usually when something becomes really popular, say facebook apps a lot of turn key solutions will appear shortstack and others can let even a tight budget integrate with latest trends. The same is true for ecommerece with ecwid allowing one to setup a facebook shop in moments.

    8. Quantity sucks, build relationships, build repeat customers and chase the right mentions.

    If these eight points do not seem to apply to your business model then maybe its time to reassess the viability of the idea, assuming its not making you money already.

    Some random thoughts, I could likely write a novelle if I sat down to tackle the subject.

  2. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to Slowdive For This Useful Post:

    Brassneck (13 April 2013), Chabrenas (15 April 2013), Dave (14 June 2013), Dave McM (12 April 2013), David S (12 April 2013), DomainNameNinja (13 April 2013), dsieg58 (12 April 2013), FinanceGuy (13 April 2013), Fish (12 April 2013), Kay (12 April 2013), MarkB (12 April 2013), Trevorjc (16 April 2013)

  3. #12
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    28
    Slowdive,

    Excellent post and right on the money. For me anyway, and what I'm musing over, is we came to the internet to get away from the Brick and mortar world of being squeezed out by hyper-competition and the heavy hand of big business. The internet offered an alternative. 10-15 years later, many of us dinosaurs are not only back in the same position, but the "hyper-competitve world" of bricks and mortar look absolutely blissful in comparison to the out-of-control competitiveness of the internet these days. At one time I took all of my businesses off of brick and mortar to cyber, now I've gone full circle and taking most of them back to real world. Regular marketing is a breeze, it seems so simple, after 15 years of internet marketing.

    I ran across this article yesterday http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archiv...r_than_fre.php which offered some solutions to many of the problems we face.

    Other posters are right too. The nature of life is change and adaption. If you don't, you die. That's all there is to it.

    From what I see, we're moving into a completely new world of the internet. I don't mean "Web 2.0" I mean web 100.0. The rules are changing, and once again, no one even knows what the rules are any more. In many senses, it may as well be 1995 all over again.

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to dsieg58 For This Useful Post:

    Chabrenas (15 April 2013), David S (15 April 2013), Kay (12 April 2013), MarkB (12 April 2013)

  5. #13
    Dormant Account
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    159
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    166
    Thanked 290 Times in 97 Posts
    Rep Power
    16
    This is a good thread. It is interesting to see the different view points.

    The real point is or rather the real question is - are you building a business?

    The rest just doesn't matter that much. If you are focusing on doing the basics well, every day, the rest will follow - it's simple - but not easy [thanks Morten for that quote].

    Provide good quality stuff to your customers and keep them coming back. That's it. Thats the goal. If you are a publisher, ecommerce merchant or whatever - that's the goal.

    Think google has waged a war on affiliates - your wrong - they have waged a war on crappy affiliates.
    Think chances of page one rankings for xyz keyword has gone to big brands - you are missing the point.
    Think ebooks are dead - think again - Kindle!
    Think the big boys have it sewn up - if you can't beat them join them.
    If you are reliant on one source of traffic for your BUSINESS - then you haven't got a business - you have a liability and at best a risk.
    I could go on.
    This is all mindset.

    The internet has evolved - yes. It has evolved and a lot of the rubbish is being dumped - AMEN. it has evolved and different kinds of rubbish is coming online - that too will evolve.
    Yes is is hard, yes it requires work, yes big G gets it wrong on many an occasion stuffing people as it goes - but to hint that opportunities are over is very wrong. It's all about your customers. Keep em coming back.

    Just my opinion.

  6. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to golles For This Useful Post:

    Chabrenas (15 April 2013), crabfoot (15 April 2013), Dave (14 June 2013), dsieg58 (23 June 2013), JillP (16 April 2013), MarkB (15 April 2013)

  7. #14
    Dormant Account
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    57
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 18 Times in 10 Posts
    Rep Power
    4
    I definitely think big business has been allowed to take over . In part its due to the international community in my opinion. The cheap labor and opportunity to make more money than normal lead to people trying all sorts of scams in google search / other search engines to provide a living. Not to mention, we all attempted to exploit the systems at some point, in some way instead of create brands and focus on one. "Greed" some might say.

    I am now selling all my sites and focusing on just one brand if at all possible. It's a google news approved site, I hope to to expand upon vigorously and turn into a 6 figure earner annually.

    I definitely know it won't be a '1 man energy' project that wins anymore. You have to work like a true corporate energy, non-stop production, to stay on top.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to cBusiness For This Useful Post:

    dsieg58 (22 June 2013)

  9. #15
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    28
    In a lot of ways, I can't blame Google for their business decisions. From their point of view, if you had a niche where the top spot is occupied by a wonderful info, content site, that generates no profit and Amazon comes along as says "I'll pay you 1 million a month in advertising fees for that position" Come on, let's face it, anyone of us would do the same. A corporation exists to make money. It's what they do. You can't blame a Dalmation for his spots.

    You can't blame other people (anywhere) for wanting to have a better life for themselves, or their children. For many people, that means scamming, dishonesty, and theft. In a lot of places around the world, they don't see it as unethical, or illegal, or even bad. They don't hold the same views of "fair play." They do what they gotta do to survive, that's it. There is no more thought than that put it into. Their view is, if you allow me to cheat you, then the fault is yours. So you can't blame Google for protecting itself from them, any more than you can blame a bank for installing silent alarms. They certainly don't see Google, or ourselves, as victims.

    I'm getting rid of most of my sites too. I'm diversifying back into bricks and mortar, as well as keeping established evergreen websites. But I no longer count on them for money, and anything internet related is piggybacked off of the existing traffic of the big sites, or used in conjunction with them. Or using offline methods to drive targeted traffic organically.

  10. #16
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    22
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 5 Times in 3 Posts
    Rep Power
    5
    Really glad I clicked on this thread.
    As a beginner it makes me completely rethink how I will go about becoming successful online.
    It is really sad how the internet has developed, with all the small guys being pushed to one side and not given a chance. But, as dsieg has said ' The nature of life is change and adaption. If you don't, you die. That's all there is to it. '.
    So I guess now the future successful people will be the ones who are adapting and thinking outside the box now.


    Last edited by earner; 23 June 2013 at 9:37 am.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to earner For This Useful Post:

    dsieg58 (23 June 2013)

  12. #17
    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Kent - the garden of England
    Posts
    6,166
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks
    4,297
    Thanked 3,342 Times in 2,133 Posts
    Rep Power
    95
    It's almost a year since this thread was started.

    Has nothing changed since then? Has anyone got any progress to report?

    I've tried to start from scratch with several things, just to see if I can get anything to work. So far I've had very little success, and certainly nothing yet I could point to as an example of how to do well with a start up these days. Nearly all my online income comes from sites which were started and the momentum built up several years ago.

    I've started diversifying away from "running websites" for a living and moved towards writing books and other writing-related work. I'm not sure what to try next. Some people say that apps are where it's at these days.

    Does anyone have any experiences of the last year that they'd be willing to share? Any comments about the industry in general?
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

    The joy of Internet delivery - the cartoon illustrating this will make you laugh!



  13. #18
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    28
    I'm moving towards playing ball with the big boys (Amazon) and bricks and mortar offline businesses. The only problem I see with Amazon is that it is 3-5 years away from "Going Google" and it will be time to pick up stakes and move again. My websites still make enough money to pay the mortgage, so I should be grateful. I put my books on Amazon and that also brings in another steady sideline. While I don't "own" any of my keywords anymore, if they search for my website by name, I show in the top. A lot is now wait and see. I decided not to sell my website and simply sit on it. My niche isn't going away so I have time. Offline marketing is much easier now, and I'm able to do a lot more with it. I wouldn't say the internet is dead, but it's in a coma. Maybe it will wake up. As someone else said, there are still plenty of ways to make money.

  14. #19
    Top Contributor crabfoot is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    East Yorkshire
    Posts
    2,193
    Blog Entries
    8
    Thanks
    489
    Thanked 1,991 Times in 1,038 Posts
    Rep Power
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by dsieg58 View Post
    The only problem I see with Amazon is that it is 3-5 years away from "Going Google" and it will be time to pick up stakes and move again.
    Pardon me for being thick as a brick, but I don't understand that comment. Particularly when Gargyl turns over around $40 billion a year, and has to plough about a quarter of that back into bribing people to promote their interests, and Amazon turns over about $60 billion a year and keeps a much higher proportion for its own purposes. WTH they both hide the real profits in their offshore branch offices, but I would appreciate some clarification of the statement.


    Progress report: there has been no progress. I have tried to start some small sites which have superb and unique content. Gargyl has ignored them. I have tried to put up sites which have the traditional semi-interesting content that encourages the visitor to click on an advert. Gargyl has de-indexed them.

    My findings are that Gargyl is still unable to detect real quality on a web page, they still like sites with crappy content as long as there are many pages illustrated with lots of pics, they still think that bounce rate and page count are the true measures of a quality site. They give bonus points for video, even if the video only shows one picture and that picture does not change in the 10 seconds it takes to play the "video", which does not have a sound track.

    Gargyl has improved their detection of sites they don't like and don't want. They still can't detect those sites they should like and should want, especially if those sites are small and following Gargyl's advice about allowing traffic to grow organically - unless the site owners are using G+ and Adwords to drive traffic to them.

    Friends, please accept this, the only intimation.

  15. #20
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    28
    Pardon me for being thick as a brick, but I don't understand that comment... but I would appreciate some clarification of the statement.
    Amazon is relatively benign now as they growing and consolidating their power base. This is the way business is when it needs the power of the population to help it grow. Sound familiar yet? So was Google. So was ebay in the early days. Remember Google's motto? "First do no harm" or some such gibberish. Haven't heard what their new motto is. The comment reflects that as a business grows more powerful, the less responsive it is to the people that helped build it. When it reaches the top, they tend to shed those same people, exactly the way Google did. Hence the statement "The only problem I see with Amazon is that it is 3-5 years away from "Going Google" and it will be time to pick up stakes and move again." Amazon may be different, on the other hand, maybe they won't. But if they do, and the realist that I am, I'm planning on it, Amazon still has 3-5 years before it happens. Then again, maybe less. Then Amazon as well will be dominated by big players, the same as Google is now.

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to dsieg58 For This Useful Post:

    crabfoot (1 April 2014)

+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. Signup Sites for Internet Marketing businesses
    By WSYSBroker in forum Buying a Website, Blog, Internet Business
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21 July 2011, 10:16 pm

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts