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Thread: Facebook Advertising: What Do You Think About Their Tactics?

  1. #21
    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
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    Good point, Justin. Thanks. I still have lots to learn about retargeting and your PoV is useful. I spent some time researching it - and writing about it - but that was in relation to affiliate marketing so I'll bow to your superior knowledge on this one. Especially as you're using it from the other side of the fence as an advertiser!

    I've no experience and therefore no knowledge from the advertiser's side, I was responding as a user, ie just a punter surfing on the Internet. So, I will have to answer in that role for the rest of this posting.

    I'm not sure why you said it was poorly executed. Wouldn't targeting previous site visitors be highly targeted?
    Not necessarily. On my usual rounds each day I look at all kinds of things, eg where to buy batik wax, where to get the best insurance for expats, where can I find the best tutorials for eBook covers? All these things. I'm happy when adverts are targeted to match the page content. I get kinda fed up if I keep getting shown ads about leg waxing because I looked for art materials that week. I think, "Well, I've found and bought what I wanted. Why do these ads have to follow me about for weeks/months after?". Is that something the advertiser is doing wrong? I don't know.

    I also don't like when the retargeting is geo-targeted. No. I don't want to date a lot of pretty Thai dolly birds - especially if I'm reading a web page about standard accounting practices! I don't have a problem with retargeting itself - I wish to heck it was relevant.

    BTW, thanks for subscribing and throwing something in the kitty. Much appreciated.
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

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    David S (6 July 2014)

  3. #22
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    I get it, Kay - getting followed around by retargeting can be aggressive and annoying...especially for things you're not really interested in. I know that sites like Moz, 99 Designs, and any of the hosting companies use retargeting pretty aggressively!

    We used a company called Perfect Audience as a 3rd party tool and were pretty happy with their service overall. (They take a piece of your overall budget) I would say, though, there were times where I'd see THREE of our banners up on the same page - ugh - talk about overkill.

    We had some success over the few months we were running the campaign, but there were diminishing returns and ad blindness caused us to constantly have to update the advertisements. We ultimately cut the campaign until we're done with our redesign. We've left the code snippets on and will get back to it once we've got our new, shiny design up and running.

    I think that with our level of traffic, it probably isn't worth it running full-time. It definitely wasn't worth it paying someone $500/month to run it once the returns had diminished past a certain level. It's probably something we'll run in-house from now. One month on, one month off...something like that.

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    Kay (7 July 2014)

  5. #23
    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
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    Yes, it's the being followed around that I object to. I don't know if that's helpful to anyone - the publisher (who has the ads on their site), the advertiser (who is annoying people by aggressively following them), or the casual surfer (who doesn't like being followed by ads for something they bought last week or something they were researching).

    I already said how I find it as a punter.

    Also, as a publisher I believe that it makes it harder to earn money from showing adverts on your site. It used to be the case that the ads were targeted to the page content. But now the ads could be about anything. This makes it tough to go for high value ads (which might be a good thing for excluding low quality sites, because it's no longer lucrative to post keyword-rich articles just to get the high value exit clicks). But it's also a matter of control. Sure, you can block certain things from being displayed on your site, but you can only do that if you know they're there. And people in different countries see different things. It would be a full-time job to be aware of everything. I received an email from an irate customer demanding to know why I had adverts for some weird thing (can't remember what it was now). He said it was disgusting and I shouldn't have ads for that sort of thing. It wasn't my fault that he'd seen whatever offended him. It was just an AdSense advert and Google had shown it to him based on his previous surfing behaviour. Aye, so we all know now what he was looking at before because he just told us his interests in his public complaint.
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

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  6. #24
    Top Contributor crabfoot is a Premium Member
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    I have seen various articles, and also a freebie eproduct, that say Facebook ads just waste time and money if you take a simple approach - but manipulating Facebook (and other social media) is definitely seen as worthwhile by a lot of large companies, there are people on Empire Avenue who make a living from it, and there are people on Empire Avenue who will offer high-price training to show you how it is done.

    I am wondering if Facebook ads work better for those people who actually sell on Facebook through the official channels - perhaps they get a special deal?

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by crabfoot View Post
    I have seen various articles, and also a freebie eproduct, that say Facebook ads just waste time and money if you take a simple approach - but manipulating Facebook (and other social media) is definitely seen as worthwhile by a lot of large companies, there are people on Empire Avenue who make a living from it, and there are people on Empire Avenue who will offer high-price training to show you how it is done.
    I signed up for Empire Avenue a few weeks ago and it seems a little overwhelming. The few times I've logged in I found my time getting sucked down a black hole. I originally signed up with the intention of using it as a more paid, hands-off traffic channel, but I'm finding they're trying to force me to play the game portion too hard.

    Any resources you can point to for Empire Avenue from a publisher's perspective looking for targeted traffic? Is there an easier pay-to-play model or do I have to go on their missions, play their game, etc.?

  8. #26
    Top Contributor crabfoot is a Premium Member
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    I joined EAv a little over a year ago. I didn't have a lot of time for it, but I can see that there are benefts to be gained from it, so I'm building up a stack of eaves for my future endeavours.

    My end objective is to use it to drive traffic, but I'm not in a hurry, and I don't want to spend money. I have a portfolio worth about 70m eaves that brings in about 170k eaves a day. I reinvest them and do a few "invest" missions each week, but I'm more interested in keeping my account alive than anything else. If you don't visit every 4 weeks or so, your account goes dormant and the dividends don't pay. So I give it about an hour a week.

    Quote Originally Posted by TryBPO View Post
    I signed up for Empire Avenue a few weeks ago and it seems a little overwhelming.
    It is overwhelming - and as a game it is somewhat boring.

    Quote Originally Posted by TryBPO View Post
    The few times I've logged in I found my time getting sucked down a black hole. I originally signed up with the intention of using it as a more paid, hands-off traffic channel, but I'm finding they're trying to force me to play the game portion too hard.
    One thing I have learned is that when people "use" you, you can learn from their strategies what works to achieve their objectives. So playing is not a complete waste of time.

    Quote Originally Posted by TryBPO View Post
    Any resources you can point to for Empire Avenue from a publisher's perspective looking for targeted traffic? Is there an easier pay-to-play model or do I have to go on their missions, play their game, etc.?
    I have yet to go into those aspects. This is about the best set of tips I can give -

    If you register your interests, you can find interest groups and interest-focused missions. Once you get into those groups you start to learn what can be done. I'm having to do other things to keep the wolf from the door at the moment, so I don't have time to learn EAv - but there are players who advertise paid services in their portfolio descriptions.
    I'm building a bankroll and observing on a casual basis, I only do "invest" missions and "gift" missions.

    What happens on EAv changes from day to day. One player, Michael Q Todd, has authored a book about using EAv. The book is not published, to get access you need to buy shares in him and do some of his missions. He has turned into a G+ specialist over the last year, which might say somethng about the rising importance of G+.

    Adam Houlahan started at about the same time as I did, with a line in his bio saying that he was a pupil of another EAv member who advertised paid coaching in how to make a living from social media. He seems to be succeeding.

    Other people you might want to look at are Chris Voss and Mick Say. There are several private groups that might be useful - to get into them is often just a matter of buying shares in the key members. Then they come around to your page and give you an invite.

    Sorry I can't be more helpful - I'm just watching EAv at the moment.
    Last edited by crabfoot; 9 July 2014 at 6:36 am. Reason: formatting lost in space

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