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Thread: Useless marketing terms

  1. #1
    Marketing Mentor Mikl is a Premium Member
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    Useless marketing terms

    A person I know recently asked for my help with optimising a site for his client. One of the terms he needed to optimise for was "Award-winning XXX", where XXX describes the client's services.

    I tried to explain that "award-winning" is useless in SEO terms, because very few people would actually search for it. After all, when was the last time you searched for "award-winning web designer" or "award-winning architectural draughtsman".

    He just about got that. I then went on to suggest that, leaving aside SEO, "award-winning" has no value in the wider marketing sense. That's because it does not meet one of the basic principles of marketing: that the the language should be about "you" and not about "me". My customers don't care if I have won an award; the only thing they care about is what benefit my services can give to them.

    This led me to think about similar "me" words and phrases. Just glancing at a few magazine adverts and websites, I found several other examples, where the advertiser is telling the world how great they are, all the while ignoring the customer:

    - Produced in our state-of-the-art factory;

    - Established 1904;

    - A family-run business;

    - An iconic brand.

    Can anyone suggest any more?

    Mike
    P.S. I am an award-winning journalist. I am, really. But who cares.

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    Top Contributor grynge is a Premium Member
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    It's not really a phrase or saying but the chinese companies I deal with love to show certificates and the building/factory.

    Here at CompanyX we are proud to produce/make/sell ProductX

    Myself I look for the asterisk * if something has an asterisk I know its bullshite*.



    *Yes Bullshite
    Last edited by grynge; 14 May 2014 at 10:03 am.
    And they thought me broken, that my tongue was coated lead, but I just couldn't make my words make sense to them, if you only listen with your ears ... I can't get in
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    New Member Mentor JimWaller is a Premium Member
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    What i find interesting about some of the "me" words is they imply "you" benefits:

    - Produced in our state-of-the-art factory;
    Implies quality or precision production "It must be exact if it is made in a state-of-the-art facility."

    - Established 1904;
    Implies trustworthiness "How can they have been around for so long if they were not trustworthy?"

    - A family-run business;
    Implies friendliness or personalized attention "It isn't just a faceless corporate machine."

    - An iconic brand.
    Implies status or notoriety "It's a brand people know, so they will recognize it on me."

    I think sometimes it is by design, and at other times, it happens quite by accident.
    Help bring Janice home My mother-in-law was hospitalized while on vacation (holiday) We're trying to bring her home.

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    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
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    Right along with the above is the "Mission Statement." This was all the rage a few years ago. Companies were actually promoting their mission statements as well. As if anyone really cares what puff piece some flunky scribbled down to make is boss look good. While it is well and good to identify your core strengths, self promotion of them reeks of pomposity. Companies frequently forget what customers actually want... a good product, a fair price, and good customer service. Most companies can't deliver those three things.

  6. #5
    Top Contributor grynge is a Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsieg58 View Post
    Companies frequently forget what customers actually want... a good product, a fair price, and good customer service. Most companies can't deliver those three things.
    I think that may have been in the past, from what I see these days, especially from the younger ones, they don't care if a product is good as long as it has the name/look.

    Ask a person if they want a product with a life time warranty they all say "Yes Please" ask them to pay for any product that does have a lifetime warranty and 99% will say it is too expensive.
    And they thought me broken, that my tongue was coated lead, but I just couldn't make my words make sense to them, if you only listen with your ears ... I can't get in
    Non ducor, duco

  7. #6
    Marketing Mentor Mikl is a Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimWaller View Post
    What i find interesting about some of the "me" words is they imply "you" benefits:
    Yes, I agree that they imply a benefit. But is that what you want in a selling point? Shouldn't you be stating the benefit clearly and unmistakeably, rather than letting the reader drawn an inference?

    Mike

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    New Member Mentor JimWaller is a Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikl View Post
    Yes, I agree that they imply a benefit. But is that what you want in a selling point? Shouldn't you be stating the benefit clearly and unmistakeably, rather than letting the reader drawn an inference?

    Mike
    I think the implied benefit is used for things the company (marketer) feels customers might perceive as being boastful if stated directly.

    "We're really trustworthy" might sound like boasting compared to "Established 1904". I'm not saying it is a good tactic, I'm just pointing out the possible reason for using it. At least with an implied benefit, the consumer is still given a reason it might be a good idea to purchase. It is worse marketing to focus on features rather than benefits.
    Help bring Janice home My mother-in-law was hospitalized while on vacation (holiday) We're trying to bring her home.

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    I used an awful hosting company called HostPapa. Their ads were always about how well their employees were treated. Like I care. (Customers were clearly considered an afterthought, if not a nuisance.)

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  11. #9
    New Member Mentor JimWaller is a Premium Member
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    Do you think they were trying to imply "Look how well we treat our staff, just imagine how well we'll treat you!"?
    Help bring Janice home My mother-in-law was hospitalized while on vacation (holiday) We're trying to bring her home.

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    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
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    Maybe they just meant, "Hey! We're all round good guys."

    More likely, perhaps there was the inference that happy staff are more motivated to do a good job (for you).
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

    The joy of Internet delivery - the cartoon illustrating this will make you laugh!



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