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Thread: Junk phone calls - Grrr

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    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
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    Junk phone calls - Grrr

    How do people cope with this? I'm talking about the UK but I expect it's just as bad in other countries. I get about half a dozen a day already and I haven't even given this new phone number to anyone (except Dave, who got it for me in the first place). Apparently most of these nuisance calls are from a well-known national broadsheet trying to get me to subscribe.

    You know what? I was already buying their newspaper regularly and now I want nothing to do with them. I couldn't decide whether to take theirs as my regular paper or another. The other just won the contest because they're not pestering me.

    Dave is experimenting with blocking all the calls on my phone except those I've white-listed - that's only one so far. I've never liked phones and this makes it even worse. How do you all cope with it?

    I think the phone company must routinely give out numbers or maybe the telemarketers just try random numbers. I'm sure it must be illegal to do this but how do you get them to stop?
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

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    In the US, we have our Federal Do Not Call list. Plus, I have a Google Voice number that I give to everyone except those I really want to hear from (ie, anyone who has my mobile number knows that I do want to hear from them).

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    In the United States, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 (TCPA) makes it illegal, among other things, for a telemarketer to use any automatic telephone dialing system or an artificial or prerecorded voice to call a cell phone without the express consent of the person whose cell phone is called.

    A person who receives such calls is entitled to bring an action against the telemarketer violating the TCPA and to recover his or her actual monetary loss from such a violation, or to receive $500 in damages for each such violation, whichever is greater. If the court finds that the company willfully or knowingly violated the TCPA, the court may increase the amount of the award to an amount equal to up to 3 times ($1,500 or 3 times actual monetary loss, if greater). That is $500 (or $1,500) for every single phone call a company makes to a cell phone using any kind of auto dialer or prerecorded voice.

    There are attorneys who specialize in bringing actions against companies for violating the TCPA and in some cases awards or settlements have totaled millions of dollars.

    Although there are still some "junk calls" to cell phones, the TCPA has severely limited the number of annoying telemarketing calls to cell phones in the United States since most call centers need to use auto dialers to be economically viable.

    In addition, some recent court cases have applied the TCPA restrictions to text messages sent to cell phones, so in the United States we also don't get many junk text messages on our cell phones.

    The TCPA and the regulations promulgated by the FCC (and the FTC) provide other restrictions that limit intrusive phone calls such as the National Do Not Call Registry mentioned by Peter Davis.

    See http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/telemarketing

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    Marketing Mentor Mikl is a Premium Member
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    In the US, we have our Federal Do Not Call list.
    We have the same in the UK. It's called the Telephone Preference Service. But its weakness is that it only protects private individuals, not businesses. I've registered my home phone with the service, but I can't do the same with my office phone.

    In the United States, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 (TCPA) makes it illegal, among other things, for a telemarketer to use any automatic telephone dialing system or an artificial or prerecorded voice to call a cell phone without the express consent of the person whose cell phone is called.
    There are similar laws in the EU. And they apply to calls to all phone, not just cell phones. But it's easily circumvented. The callers simply call from overseas - typically from Asian countries, I believe. Inter-continental phone charges are so ridiculously low these days, it's economic for them to do that.

    For me, the biggest problem these days is pre-recorded phone calls. I get three or four of these every day. And there's nothing I can do about it. Because there isn't a human at the other end of the line, I can't even let off steam by giving them an ear-full of what I think of them (in any case, I'm far too polite to do that).

    If anyone can come up with a permanent, effective and low-cost solution to this problem, I will personally nominate him or her for a knighthood.

    Mike

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    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
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    Having to opt out of anything, regardless of the legal aspect of it, has always seemed to me like a gross invasion of my personal rights. I felt the same about Pinterest when apparently people were obliged to opt out of allowing them to steal our content. I despise opt-out email newsletters (which several of my competitors use - and then boast to advertisers about how big their spammy list is). I feel the same way about any spam. And now I've moved country and have barely got my feet dry from swimming here and already I don't get any peace because I have a phone which no one is supposed to know the number of. Something isn't right. It's not morally right. Why can't I be allowed to enjoy my life without such a nuisance? Oh, I have to opt out of it, or to use legal remedies to enforce my right to opt out.

    The culprits are thieves. They steal people's time and the ability to go about their business or leisure in peace.

    This one that's pestering me doesn't even give up after a few failed attempts. They're trying every day. Can they not get the message? I'm never going to answer their call. I don't know about these things - is there any point in answering to the extent that I let them do their spiel and never say anything? I mean, take the call and leave the phone in another room while they get on with it? Will they ever get the message that I'm not interested? Or is this something I have to suffer until I change phone number? Then I'd have to get a new phone number every day presumably, because they'll be onto the new one as soon as I get it. No wonder I hate phones.

    Is there any phone system where you can press a switch on your phone to send an electric shock down the thing to zap the caller right in the ear-hole? How about some kind of shrieking noise? (But that would probably upset the neighbours.) Why does this rape of people's space just seem to be accepted?

    To hell with Boris, Dave, Millipede, and all the other politicians. If we get an Independent standing with a manifesto to imprison any British company who employs these tactics - including making calls from overseas to British residents - they'll have my vote.

    Hmphh. I don't even feel better after that rant. I need a hug - or maybe a glass of wine.
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

    The joy of Internet delivery - the cartoon illustrating this will make you laugh!



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    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
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    If anyone can come up with a permanent, effective and low-cost solution to this problem,
    With a landline, screen all your calls (Silent ring) and never pick up unless you know or expecting someone to call. With a cell phone, send all calls to voicemail unless you know them or are expecting them to call. Then get used to the delete button.

    If you want to have some fun, hand your phone to a child and tell him/her "Santa is calling and want to speak to them." Flatulence is also a good response.

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    Top Contributor crabfoot is a Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsieg58 View Post
    With a landline, screen all your calls (Silent ring) and never pick up unless you know or expecting someone to call.
    Another intercontinental difference - on a UK landline, you have to pay extra to be able to read the number that is calling.


    And while we are on the subject, the UK preference service only works if the twit that is cold calling works for a company that has learned how to use that service. Lots of them haven't ...

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    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
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    I think with a landline the same is true here. There are also ways to get around it. With a cell phone it usually comes with the package. The easy way is to keep your cell phone turned off unless you want to use it, and turn it back off again after. Both go straight to messages. (For me anyway) If it is a telemarketer, they won't (usually leave a message. If it is a recording, they do, but that is what the delete key is for. Either way, YOU aren't disturbed and it is on your terms and not theirs. I tell everyone who I want to call to identify themselves as well, or they also won't get a call back. As far as I'm concerned, talking to someone on the phone is a privilege, not a right. I don't HAVE to speak to anyone.

    My personal pet peeve: People calling that say "Who is this?" before identifying themselves and what they want. They also get hung up on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay View Post
    How do people cope with this?
    By blocking them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kay View Post
    To hell with Boris, Dave, Millipede, and all the other politicians. If we get an Independent standing with a manifesto to imprison any British company who employs these tactics - including making calls from overseas to British residents - they'll have my vote.
    What's the point of an independent with that manifesto? There's no way he'll get enough votes in Parliament to do anything against marketers. Politicians love marketers - marketers make us consume and the more we consume the higher the GDP (who looks at debt any more?). Will Self has a good piece on consumption. I'm anti-consumption and I support movements such as Enough. Anti-consumerism is growing but longer term seems to have little chance against retail might with specialist firms emerging (article) to help retailers/marketers combat this "threat". So don't expect cold calling to go away any time soon.
    Find the right business brokers to maximise the value you extract from your business and improve the chances of selling your business.

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    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
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    Hmm. Did you see all the negative reviews?

    Even if that thing works today, you can be sure that it won't work tomorrow as all the call spammers learn new tricks to circumvent it. See also the first question about the product.

    Q: My wife works with the NHS and her calls come up as 'number witheld'. Will these be blocked ?

    A:
    I am not one hundred percent sure but you can ask people to dial 1470 in front of the number and it then allows calls to come through. Hope this helps
    What's stopping the call spammers typing 1470 before any call? You can be sure that they'll quickly adopt any methods of getting around any blocks.
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

    The joy of Internet delivery - the cartoon illustrating this will make you laugh!



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