+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: I've never seen this trick before

  1. #1
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    29

    I've never seen this trick before

    Maybe it's old news, I don't know. But I was looking for OEM Adobe software. I typed in "Cheap Adobe OEM software" into Google. You have, of course, Adobe is occupying the top 3 positions. But after that, you have all .edu websites ALL LEADING TO THE SAME .COM WEBSITE. In other words, someone had hijacked and/or redirected legitimate .edu sites redirecting them all to the same sales page. You had the entire page one of Google going to only 2 websites. (Adobe and scam site)

    Has anyone else seen this technique before?

  2. #2
    Top Contributor crabfoot is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    East Yorkshire
    Posts
    2,194
    Blog Entries
    8
    Thanks
    489
    Thanked 1,991 Times in 1,038 Posts
    Rep Power
    57
    I tried the same search, but no edu results came up.


    OTOH the page came up with this notice in place of results 8,9, and 10 :


    In response to a complaint we received under the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act, we have removed 1 result(s) from this page. If you wish, you may read the DMCA complaint that caused the removal(s) at ChillingEffects.org.



    https://www.chillingeffects.org/notice.cgi?sID=1757026
    There's a long list of offending URLs in the notice, including some .edu names.
    Why they tell us instead of serving the next three results, I don't know.

  3. #3
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    29
    Here is what mine looks like

    9-27-2014 1-26-19 PM.jpg

    It's pretty impressive in a dark kind of way to take over the entire page one of Google. That is some serious black hat voodoo.
    Last edited by dsieg58; 27 September 2014 at 2:21 pm.

  4. #4
    Top Contributor crabfoot is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    East Yorkshire
    Posts
    2,194
    Blog Entries
    8
    Thanks
    489
    Thanked 1,991 Times in 1,038 Posts
    Rep Power
    57
    Weird - but edu systems are often not very secure, the users being regarded as capable of monitoring their own area.
    It does suggest that there is an advantage to be gained from hijacking pages on an edu site, or simply paying students for access. Perhaps G is still allowing link power to affect the ratings of such edu pages?

  5. #5
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    29
    We all know .edu links are some of the best link juice. This suggests to me there is a hole in Google's algro. Some of the (cached) pages are gibberish. (Lots of keywords, but no solid content) So my guess is they put them up on the .edu legitimate site, using it to gain a foothold on page one, then redirected it to a scam site. What's amazing to me is the fact they were able to overtake ALL of the positions on page one. Like I said, that is some serious black hat voodoo. If I was serious about reverse engineering it, I get out Market Samurai and look up the links pointing to those pages.

    And it doesn't stop there. Page two is almost COMPLETELY overtaken as well. It even beats out wikipedia.

  6. #6
    Top Contributor Dave McM is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    797
    Thanks
    501
    Thanked 407 Times in 253 Posts
    Rep Power
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by dsieg58 View Post
    I typed in "Cheap Adobe OEM software" into Google
    Like crabfoot, I didn't get any .edu sites when I entered that phrase. On the other hand, when I typed in the words "cheap", "adobe", "captivate" and "software", I got the same results as you. Not all .edu by any means, but all apparently linked to educational institutions, and all redirecting to the same site - albeit to slightly differing subdomains: [string of 16 random letters].[website].com.

  7. #7
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    29
    Another interesting point. Since we are all in different geographical locations the results are different. I found it next to impossible to get on page one, no matter what I did. It blows me away that this guy was able to dominate the entire top two pages of a keyword. (I did that once (white hat) back in 2010) and he did it (Obviously) using .edu domains. So it appears, you hack an .edu site, deliver link juice to that page, drive it up in the SERP's, then redirect once it is there. Not that I want to do it, and I'm sure it is going to be a short lived victory, but think about it. He is selling software. The site looks completely legitimate. IF he is scamming that far, what is the end game? Collect credit card numbers?

  8. #8
    Top Contributor
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    France. Between Limoges and Brive la Gaillarde.
    Posts
    1,273
    Blog Entries
    5
    Thanks
    2,874
    Thanked 458 Times in 331 Posts
    Rep Power
    21
    He may just be an illegal seller of OEM or NFR software - or even scams like selling updates as complete installations. It seems to be a big game - I found several sites warning punters and telling them how to identify such scams by their terms of service.

  9. #9
    Established Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    241
    Thanks
    155
    Thanked 288 Times in 141 Posts
    Rep Power
    16
    It's not just that software either, although they are less effective on others. I tried "cheap microsoft office software" and found .edu redirects to the same site, although starting on page 2 of the SERPs and much fewer links that I could see.

    The same results show up in Bing, so both the major search engines fell for the guy's trick big time.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to David S For This Useful Post:

    Chabrenas (29 September 2014)

  11. #10
    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Midwest-USA, Southeast Asia
    Posts
    1,024
    Thanks
    821
    Thanked 1,139 Times in 565 Posts
    Rep Power
    29
    For as sophisticated as Google algros are supposed to be, this seems like a pretty amateurish trick. We all know .gov and .edu links are the best and have been for some time. .gov sites are a lot harder to get into. Google should have known, or been on the look out for, this kind of action. Additionally, they have nothing to tell them their entire first and second page is being redirected to one site? Sort of goes against their stated policy of returning the best results.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to dsieg58 For This Useful Post:

    Chabrenas (29 September 2014)

+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. SEO trick: How do they do this?
    By Clinton in forum General & Miscellaneous
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 4 September 2010, 4:21 am
  2. Am i missing a trick?
    By Freeman1974 in forum Making Money Online, Monetization
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 2 August 2010, 5:08 pm
  3. GoDaddy missed a trick
    By Clinton in forum Selling a Website, Blog, Domain or Business
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 8 March 2010, 11:52 am

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts