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Thread: Buying a website banned from Adsense

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    Buying a website banned from Adsense

    Hi EPers,

    I've chance to get for a fair price a website that has good traffic but got banned by Adsense for 'thin content'. Adsense was accounting for 90% of the revenue.

    Did anyone manage to turn a previously banned website profitable again using other ad networks?



    Thanks for sharing your experience

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    Publishing Mentor dsieg58 is a Premium Member
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    I might be wrong (Kay is a better one to ask) but I think web masters (Individual accounts) get banned, not websites.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsieg58 View Post
    I might be wrong (Kay is a better one to ask) but I think web masters (Individual accounts) get banned, not websites.
    Thanks, in any case I won't risk my Adsense account on this website.

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    Marketing Mentor Mikl is a Premium Member
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    I might be wrong (Kay is a better one to ask) but I think web masters (Individual accounts) get banned, not websites.
    That's my understanding as well.

    When you take over an AdSense site, the first thing you will do is to change the existing Publisher ID in all the ads to your own AdSense Publisher ID. As far as AdSense is concerned, the ad traffic will then belong to you. The fact that it comes from a site with the same URL as one that was banned should not matter.

    That said, if the site really did have thin content, why would you want to buy it? If you keep the content as it is, it will continue to earn AdSense's displeasure. If you put a lot of effort into improving the content, why bother with the original site? If I was in your shoes, I'd be inclined to walk away.

    Mike

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    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
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    I have no experience of buying a website which previously belonged in an account which was banned, although it's fair to say that I still make a significant percentage of my online income from AS, so I do have some experience of the beast.

    The advice already given in this thread seems pretty good to me, although I can see the benefit of buying something with thin content if you believe you can improve on it. If you think it's a good bet, then might it be possible to buy the site, fix it up, and then set up a new AS account, perhaps in the name of some willing friend/relative who isn't active online? That way you'd not be risking your main account. Additionally, there may be benefits from the back links and age of the site, although you might want to do a link audit to get rid of anything dodgy. The traffic sounds good! Could that be redirected somewhere less risky? As Mike says, though, maybe it's just as easy to start from scratch or buy something less risky.

    I've tried various alternatives to AS, nearly all of that is documented here on EP in various threads, and I never had much success with them. That said, I only run content sites in certain niches - other types of sites have apparently succeeded with these alternatives.

    Instead of looking at AS alternatives, you might also consider a different business model, eg affiliate marketing. But if the content continues to be thin, you could be risking the wrath of Google search and others, such as Amazon, in the future.

    Good luck, whatever you decide.
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

    The joy of Internet delivery - the cartoon illustrating this will make you laugh!



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    Marketing Mentor Mikl is a Premium Member
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    But if the content continues to be thin, you could be risking the wrath of Google search and others, such as Amazon, in the future.
    I don't think Amazon would stamp on thin content. As far as I know, they are happy for their affiliate links to appear on any site, no matter what the content, provided they get the clicks. (I might be wrong about that.)

    Mike

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    Moderator Kay is a Premium Member
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    Perhaps badly worded by me, Mike. To clarify, I meant that thin content could pose problems because changes to G's algo could drastically reduce traffic in the first place. Additionally, if you consider selling as an Amazon affiliate as an alternative revenue stream to AdSense, Amazon is likely to also take a dim view of it. Some time ago, they removed a significant number of book reviews by authors. More recently, they're taking action again fake reviews. It seems to me that "thin content" could be next. Maybe they don't care who gets the commission-earning click, but on the other hand, they don't seem to be too keen to be associated with what they perceive as dodgy stuff either. It's all down to which affiliate earns the attribution, and if you accept that search algos (including Amazon's) will play an important part in that, then why wouldn't they be happy to cut the dross and be represented by higher quality publishers?

    However, you could be right, maybe they won't see thin content in the same light as fake reviews.
    British Expat - helping people to live and work abroad since the year 2000.

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    Thank you folks for the replies!

    For this website I can only try the another AS account or AS alternatives hoping to find one that works well with the traffic.

    To answer the question:

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikl View Post
    That said, if the site really did have thin content, why would you want to buy it? If you keep the content as it is, it will continue to earn AdSense's displeasure. If you put a lot of effort into improving the content, why bother with the original site? If I was in your shoes, I'd be inclined to walk away.
    Without going too much into acquisition strategies: I can get the website for a good price and turn it in a quick-win with very little effort.
    If I have to put too much work on it (like changing content or model) then I agree, I would not bother.

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    Hi EPers,

    Just one information for you: Adsense actually disabled serving ads on that specific domain, leaving the account active and serving other domains.
    This is the message the current owner got:
    Hello,This message is to alert you that one of your websites is not currently in compliance with our AdSense program policies and as a result, ad serving has been disabled to your website.
    Issue ID#: <removed>
    Ad serving has been disabled to: <removed>
    Example page where violation occurred: <removed>
    Action required: Check all other remaining sites in your account for compliance.
    Current account status: Active

    Cheers

  10. #10
    Marketing Mentor Mikl is a Premium Member
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    That sounds much better. There's no question of the account being terminated or the publisher being banned. It's a simple case of needing to add some useful content, which, from what you said earlier, you were planning to do anyway.

    Mike

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