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Thread: Is it hard to sell training for its own sake?

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    Quote Originally Posted by meathead1234 View Post
    So you're telling me that eBook I just bought on Clickbank isn't going to make me beautiful?!
    Gwon, ask for a refund, y munky ... unless it discusses major surgery and hormone injections!

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeb View Post
    I still say nobody takes training for its own sake. That is - because they like going in the classroom.


    There was someone I used to work with - Ugo, he was "our" cleaner, and also worked as a member of the support staff at Uxbridge University. Once a week he would give a formal lecture which was intended to teach Spanish to the English - his lectures were well attended, educational, and might have been useful if I actually needed to use Spanish.

    Sometimes it happens that "training" or "education" can also be entertainment.

    I've actually entertained that way myself - accompanying my wife, who unfortunately has little linguistic ability, to language lessons where I was somewhat ahead of the class (and a great aid to the teacher, I'm not into upstaging people). Ugo was a good teacher in more than one way!
    Last edited by KenW3; 12 April 2012 at 9:49 pm. Reason: Merged Posts

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    Quote Originally Posted by omarabid View Post
    tke71709 is summing it up. Certainly, distribution channels (like marketers and advertising) can be bring you leads but there should be a point in buying your product. Your ability to convince the buyer that your product (ebook, video, or whatever it is) solves their problem, will make you a sale (a.k.a conversion ratio).


    In the case of the MMO quick and get rich, you are selling dreams. The target audience is generally 20 something or less. You don't have much money, that's why it cost $49 or less. They don't have work experience, that's why they are easily dumped.


    And yeah, they are young and they want $$$.
    You would be surprised!

    Check out the demographics of lists from listbrokers of buyers, of buyers of products, also the demographics of the audience on some of the big sites like warrior and I think you are in for a surprise

    The buyers are overwhelmingly male, and middle aged, and have some disposable income: in fact depending on the product, the demographic can be focussed in the higher income brackets for products such as "make money from spreadbetting"

    Direct marketers need to research demographics, particularly now advertising to a demographic has become easier than ever before with such as facebook PPC and quantcast. Some mailing list brokers put demographics online too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by omarabid View Post
    In the case of the MMO quick and get rich, you are selling dreams. The target audience is generally 20 something or less. You don't have much money, that's why it cost $49 or less. They don't have work experience, that's why they are easily dumped.
    Hi omarabid, and welcome to experienced-people.net

    I think you hit the spot. Maybe LSLs in the MMO market are just different to LSL elsewhere - I haven't seen a single LSL in the MMO market that isn't selling, as you say, a "dream". Even if their success is not limited, as Mike says, to a certain age range or sex, they do work best with the most gullible, the most desperate, the ones most looking for a way out of their financial problems. These are the ones most willing to buy into the dream and assess the cost against the huge benefits they associate with achieving this dream.

    Check out the demographics of lists from listbrokers of buyers, of buyers of products, also the demographics of the audience on some of the big sites like warrior and I think you are in for a surprise
    Surprise me. Can you point to some stats of the demographic that buys into these products? (We do know that meathead1234, a young male, buys liposuction, cosmetic and breast implant ebooks! )
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clinton View Post
    Hi omarabid, and welcome to experienced-people.net

    I think you hit the spot. Maybe LSLs in the MMO market are just different to LSL elsewhere - I haven't seen a single LSL in the MMO market that isn't selling, as you say, a "dream". Even if their success is not limited, as Mike says, to a certain age range or sex, they do work best with the most gullible, the most desperate, the ones most looking for a way out of their financial problems. These are the ones most willing to buy into the dream and assess the cost against the huge benefits they associate with achieving this dream.


    Surprise me. Can you point to some stats of the demographic that buys into these products? (We do know that meathead1234, a young male, buys liposuction, cosmetic and breast implant ebooks! )
    There are a lot of sources here just a limited selection.

    The demographics of site visitors - use quantcast to see that warrior forum is biassed towards older male groups: http://www.quantcast.com/www.warriorforum.com - although places like warrior are cheapskate - so tend to reflect a lower earning groups.

    With actual buyers Take the rate cards for listbrokers ( much of which information is not avaiable except to subscribers ) - in the UK look for example at hilitedms cards which publishes information for lists such as booking line belonging to a well known marketer
    http://www.hilitedms.co.uk/hilite/se...=NNBOOK&menu=1
    Middle aged.. Male. Well to do.

    Look at facebook demographics for specific interests, which will confirm that internet marketers have a proedominance there

    Also LOOK at the audience at some of the conference videos online.
    Middle age to oldser male in predominance

    And so on. All serious direct marketers must research the demographics of their audience.

    One aspect of this blows many of the posters arguments out of the water completely to the extent that the better of these lists have repeate buyers from clearly intelligent people. From which you can conclude that at least some of the products actually work and the more discerning publishers stick to those which is why they get repeat buyers!!

    I also dispute that products are useless sold only to gullible because they are sold as a WSO - some of them are very good value - although the ones I buy are specific tasks within internet marketing.

    Someones observations of "they all sell the dream" is simply an observation that with all products you offer the outcome, not product. Slimmer. Better photographs. Rich Lifestyle. That is how you sell, because that is what people want to buy - they don;t want to buy training for its own sake

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    Kay; You're comparing MMO training to a college degree. Although you receive training in both, the motive for entering them is very different (at least in the US). I believe a person looking for MMO training is doing so because he/she wants the knowledge to take the plunge into that market. A person acquiring a college degree is doing so because he/she just wants a better job somewhere. Also in the US, you're brain washed into believing that a college degree is absolutely necessary if you want to succeed in life as an adult. So again, I think that the motives are vastly different. Consequently, if a potential MMO trainer touts: no guarantees, some good knowledge etc, I can see why that wouldn't sell. What's missing in most of the MMO training is honesty regarding the dedication and work ethic needed to succeed in making money online. So yes, I think it is difficult to sell training for it's own sake as I think most folks want training for the purpose of using it for monetary gains.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Denny For This Useful Post:

    Clinton (13 April 2012), Kay (13 April 2012)

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